Climate Reality Project – Iowa Training

Paul Deaton(NB: I submitted this brief bio to The Climate Reality Project to be posted on the web site as part of the promotion of the Iowa training May 5-7). Paul Deaton of Solon, Iowa retired in 2009 after a career in transportation and logistics, seeking a way to sustain a life in the rural community he calls home. He became a Climate Reality Leader in Chicago in 2013 as a continuation of advocacy work he had been doing since his participation in the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970.

“Iowans see the effects of global warming and climate change in their daily lives, but often don’t get beyond discussing the weather,” he said. “The understanding of global warming and its impact on severe weather events I gained at the Chicago training has been invaluable in increasing awareness of how weather is connected to climate.”

Becoming a Climate Reality Leader provided tools and resources to address everyday concerns about Iowa’s record flooding, severe storms and changes in the hydrologic cycle. As an agricultural state this matters.

Home of the first in the nation Iowa caucuses, there is a political tone to many conversations about our environment.

“I’m proud to be a part of the Climate Reality Project and the work of sustaining our lives in a turbulent world.”

This is how The Climate Reality Project edited my submitted comments:

Paul Deaton knows that if you want proof of climate change, all you need to do is ask a farmer. As a native of Iowa, Paul has seen how farmers and rural communities have had to face the devastating effects of climate change. In 2009, Paul retired from his career in transportation and logistics to advocate for sustainable ways to support life in the rural community he calls home.

Paul has played an active role in his community, including being elected as a Township Trustee, serving on the county Board of Health, and serving on the Boards of multiple non-profit organizations.

Paul joined the Climate Reality Leadership Corps at our training in Chicago in 2013 where, he says, he received “the tools and resources to address everyday concerns about Iowa’s record flooding, severe storms and changes in the hydrologic cycle.” Since then, he has given presentations to community groups across Iowa, helping them connect the dots between recent extreme weather events, climate change, and agriculture.

Environmental advocacy is the centerpiece of Paul’s volunteer efforts, and he is “proud to be a part of the Climate Reality Project and the work of sustaining our lives in a turbulent world.”

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